Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/centralcoastjspui/handle/1/1084
Title: VDR gene methylation as a molecular adaption to light exposure: Historic, recent and genetic influences
Authors: Veysey, Martin
Beckett, Emma L
Jones, P.
Duesing, K.
Martin, C.
Furst, J.
Yates, Z.
Jablonski, N.G.
Chaplin, G.
Lucock, M.
Keywords: Genes
Year: Sep-2017
Citation: Volume 29, Issue 5
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. We examined whether degree of VDR gene methylation acts as a molecular adaptation to light exposure. We explored this in the context of photoperiod at conception, recent UV irradiance at 305 nm, and gene-latitude effects. METHODS: Eighty subjects were examined for VDR gene-CpG island methylation density. VDR gene variants were also examined by PCR-RFLP. RESULTS: Photoperiod at conception was significantly positively related to VDR methylation density, explaining 17% of the variance in methylation (r2  = 0.17; P = .001). Within this model, photoperiod at conception and plasma 25(OH)D independently predicted methylation density at the VDR-CpG island. Recent UV exposure at 305 nm led to a fivefold increase in mean methylation density (P = .02). Again, UV exposure and plasma 25(OH)D independently predicted methylation density at the VDR-CpG island. In the presence of the BsmI mutant allele, methylation density was increased (P = .01), and in the presence of the TaqI or FokI mutant allele, methylation density was decreased (P = .007 and .04 respectively). Multivariate modelling suggests plasma 25(OH)D, photoperiod at conception, recent solar irradiance, and VDR genotype combine as independent predictors of methylation at the VDR-CpG island, explaining 34% of the variance in methylation (R2  = 0.34, P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: Duration of early-life light exposure and strength of recent irradiance, along with latitudinal genetic factors, influence degree of VDR gene methylation consistent with this epigenetic phenomenon being a molecular adaptation to variation in ambient light exposure. Findings contribute to our understanding of human biology.
URI: http://elibrary.cclhd.health.nsw.gov.au/centralcoastjspui/handle/1/1084
ISSN: 1042-0533
DOI: 10.1002/ajhb.23010
Journal Title: American Journal of Human Biology
Appears in Collections:Health Service Research

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in the archive are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.